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Understanding Medicaid Planning
Presented by Laurie Steiner, Esq., Solomon, Steiner & Peck, Ltd.

Aging is inevitable, and a gradual (or not so gradual) inability to function independently is a great concern for many people. While the prospect of entering a nursing home is a daunting one, equally frightening is the expense of nursing home care. Although purchasing long-term care insurance might be the most logical move, not everyone can afford the cost of its premiums. Many people feel that their only option is to spend down their life savings in order to private-pay nursing home care. Once this money has been exhausted, they’ll apply for Medicaid. But this isn’t the way it has to be. To qualify for Medicaid, both your income and the value of your assets must fall below certain limits, which vary from state to state. In determining your eligibility for Medicaid, a state may count only the income and assets that are legally available to you for paying your bills. Consequently, a number of tools have arisen to facilitate Medicaid qualification.

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